Old yes, but feeling good!

This is our Spenser. He is 16.5 and to us he is still as sweet and lovable as when he was an 8 week old baby, soft as a plush stuffed animal. He is still a happy boy, begs for cheese bits when we make a sandwich, eats with gusto, poops just fine (more on that, anon), and barks to ask for a walk – or if I take the other dog ...

Water Please...

Your dog or cat should always have a bowl of fresh water next to their food. Keep this topped up and change the water regularly. Your pet will probably be able to tell if the water has been standing around for ...

Remarkable Experience!

Remarkable Experience!

“Sadie, what was one of your most remarkable experiences?”  Shelby asked.

“Oh! Without a doubt, it was my first date with Monroe!”

“Tell me about it.”

“I wanted everything  perfect that night and when my shoe strap came loose, he was right there to fix it and he handled my awkward situation perfectly.”

Our loveable cats, but what do their actions mean?

Our loveable cats, but what do their actions mean?

Whether it be fighting with the neighbors cats, between siblings or other family cats or pets or even towards us, aggressive cats are a problem.

However there is no one reason for any of these situations and they must be approached differently.

  • Sudden aggression towards us or other pets in the home could be caused by what is known as aggression trauma and can be brought on my some traumatic recent experience such as a visit to the vets.
  • General aggression is often a learned behavior and is often associated with cats who have been abused or have not had the benefit of being brought up with their mother or siblings. We humans can also have a hand in promoting this behavior, although we are probably unaware that we are doing it.

Why Do We LOVE Our Pets?

Why Do We LOVE Our Pets?

There's a deep-rooted reason why we humans surround ourselves with dogs and cats and other animals. New research finds we are hardwired to respond to other critters, and the mechanism that makes us do that probably dates back hundreds of millions of years to the time when vertebrates were first evolving.

The secret is buried deep in a very old part of the brain, called the amygdala, long recognized as the seat of emotional reaction. Scientists at the California Institute of Technology and the University of California at Los Angeles were able to measure brain activity in 41 persons on a cell-by-cell level and found that neurons in the amygdala became extremely active when participants were shown pictures of animals.